Category Archives: PEOPLE

The Australian 37-year-old guy who retired as a self-made millionaire following two simple rules

In 1956, Warren Buffett was managing around half a million dollars. He was working from a tiny study that could be entered only by passing through his bedroom.

He handled everything personally: typing letters on an IBM typewriter, filing paperwork, doing his own taxes. And now, he’s one of the wealthiest people on the planet.

Chris Reining retired at the ripe old age of 37.

This got me thinking about what it means to be resourceful. That if being resourceful can put you on the path to riches, why aren’t more people resourceful?

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Dave Hughes responds to critics who said he spent far too much on a house from The Block.HA-HA SAYS THE CLOWN

DAVE Hughes is requesting an apology from  the property experts who criticised the amount he paid for one of The Block houses last year 2017.

The comedian dropped $3.067 million ($447,000 over the reserve) on the five-bedroom home in Elsternwick in southeast Melbourne that was renovated by Josh Barker and Elyse Knowles.

RELATED: How Hughes went from being on the dole to one of Australia’s most high-paid entertainers

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“I copped so much flak for that,” Hughes said yesterday on his Hit Network drive show with Kate Langbroek. “It was ridiculous and it’s gone on and on and on.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“A lot of experts had their say about my purchase … There are articles that have been written all year having a go at me. One article from one mob called Property One or something, they had a dinner party discussion about how much I overpaid for it.”

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

Reading from the article, Hughes said, “Based on our assessment we think Hughesy has paid somewhere between $417,000 and $517,000 too much. We’re confident it’s closer to the $500,000 level.”

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

The comedian even invited a property expert onto his Network Ten show, Hughesy, We Have a Problem, who told him he’d paid around $250,000 too much for the block house.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

But now, 10 months on, Hughes is adamant the experts were wrong based on the sale of yet another Block house on the weekend.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“The house next to the house I bought, Sticks and Wombat’s house, got sold over the weekend,” he said on radio yesterday.

“Sticks and Wombat’s house got sold just the other day … for $180,000 more than it sold for on the TV less than a year ago,” Hughes stated.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“They got $2.83 million on the weekend and with my house being worth more than theirs, because it’s a better house in a better location, Katie, I would like an apology,” he said to Langbroek who also criticised the amount he paid.

Hughes said that the house he bought was better than Sticks and Wombat’s house because his was on the northern end. He also added that his house came with $200,000 worth of furniture whereas Sticks and Wombat’s house was sold unfurnished on the weekend.

“You’ve got to admit that that is pretty good justification,” Hughes said, before giving a shout-out to his bank.

“I’d like the bank to apologise also because they valued my house a lot less when I tried to get the loan. They’re fools! I told the bank they’re idiots!”

Hughes is currently renting out the property in Elsternwick but he did confess to Triple M’s Hot Breakfast in January that it took him a while to locate tenants.

“I had trouble renting it,” he said. “It took a fair while.

“At one point the real estate agent rang me and said, ‘someone wants to move in but they’ve got a dog’. I felt like saying, ‘I don’t care whether they’ve got a meth lab’.

“It’s a little dog and that’s fine. They put in their own doggie door.”

According to realestate.com.au, rent for the five-bedroom house would be somewhere between $2500-$3000 per week.

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Henry Sapiecha

 

Australian cupcake mogul Katelyn Matheson on track to make fortune — before her 21st birthday

WHEN Katelyn Matheson was 18, she decided to earn a little extra pocket money by selling homemade cupcakes at her local farmers’ market.

She made a few hundred dollars after selling 150 cakes after her first day — a fortune for a teenage TAFE cookery student.

But word of mouth spread, and within days she was being inundated with orders and requests via her Facebook page.

Soon, she was baking 5000 cupcakes a week to keep up with demand, and her business, Cake Creations by Kate, was born. Support this industrious girl & buy her products Australia.

“I was still living with mum at the time and I did it all in her kitchen — poor thing; I took over the house,” she said.

“It turned into a massive thing. On Friday nights there used to be cars everywhere on our street with people lined up at our door to pick up orders.

“It started out as a way to earn a little bit of extra money while I was studying but all of a sudden, people were asking about the cupcakes non-stop. I didn’t predict it would get this big.”

Ms Matheson remembers setting up trestle tables throughout her mother’s house one night to hold 4000 cupcakes that had been ordered — that was her mother’s breaking point, and the teen realised it was time to take the business to the next level.

She decided to lease a shop at her local shopping centre, but centre management asked her to trial a temporary, pop-up store first as they were concerned the then-19-year-old was too young to handle the responsibilities of a long-term lease.

They shouldn’t have been.

There was a “20m line” of eager customers waiting from the moment the store opened — and Ms Matheson had completely sold out within an hour-and-a-half.

She signed a lease almost immediately and today Ms Matheson runs two stores with a third set to open in inner-Melbourne’s QV centre this month, and with more pop-up stores to follow.

She’s also established partnerships with corporate and wholesale clients including ANZ, Crown Casino, Myer, NAB, Optus and Telstra and has branched into wedding cakes and party favours as well.

🌸
I’m the luckiest girl is the world to have this amazing lady as my Mum, she is always so caring and puts everyone before herself, she is my biggest fab, she always supports me no matter what & her kind heart and generous natures makes everyone smile around her. Thank you Mum for being the best Mum & I hope all the Mums have a great day and get spoilt with love today

And it seems the cupcake business is a lucrative one — Ms Matheson is on track to make $1.6 million by the end of 2018, well before her 21st birthday.

She said the degree of her success had been “crazy” — but insists getting rich was never her objective.

“It’s absolutely never been my goal and I’ve never lost sight of my passion on this whole journey,” she said.

“I don’t wake up thinking about money. People say I must love making lots of money on big days like Father’s Day or Mother’s Day, but that’s not my goal — I love what I do, creating desserts people love, and I never let money get in the way.

“But it’s nice to be so young and have the opportunity to make some money and be successful. I never came from a really wealthy family and my family always taught me the importance of genuine hard work.”

Ms Matheson said her success had happened so quickly she has had little chance to enjoy it, working around the clock and investing a lot of her revenue back into her company through kitchen supplies and equipment to streamline the business.

And she stressed her phenomenal success has also come with many challenges.

“It definitely hasn’t all been smooth sailing. It sounds like it’s all rainbows and unicorns but it has come with a lot of hardship. Especially being so young, there are challenges when you start making money — I was investing every single cent into new equipment, with one machine costing $35,000,” she said.

“And it becomes harder the more staff you employ. Next week our 20th staff member will come on board and it is hard to manage so many different people, but I’m learning to be versatile and a strong, independent woman.”

She said the secret ingredient to her success has been hard work, quality ingredients and treating staff well.

Ms Matheson’s signature cupcakes include Rainbow, Salted Caramel, Triple Chocolate and Jam Donut.

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Henry Sapiecha

The Queensland teenager earning a small fortune through e-commerce side hustle

DURING the day, Brisbane Qld Australia teen Jack Bloomfield heads off to do school like most other 16-year-olds.

But when he gets home, the Year 11 student immediately jumps on his computer to manage his e-commerce side hustle business.

It’s a venture that’s paying off far greater than the part-time jobs most other teens have on their resumes.

Since launching his parent company BloomVentures at age 15, Mr Bloomfield now operates a number of e-commerce stores, including Best Bargain Club, which all sell a variety of different products from novelty items to skincare products online.

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While he declined to reveal his company’s total revenue income and stressed that his earnings varied from week to week, Mr Bloomfield said that during a strong period, he was he was making “north of $2900 a day”, and bank documents revealed to news.com.au supported  his claim.

“Currently, I am turning over just north of $2900 a day through multiple ventures but primarily Shopify and e-commerce,” he said.

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“Between the age of 14 and 15 I was trialling different side hustles like Forex trading. I made a few thousand dollars here and there but I got my big break when I was 15.

“I got into the world of e-commerce, and I began selling carbon fibre money clips … then I scaled it all the way up through a method called drop-shipping.

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“I now have over five e-commerce stores turning over thousands of dollars per day … Through that time I have scaled my personal brand up and I now have more than 12,000 followers on Instagram with hundreds of connections within Australia and overseas.

“Last year I started to aggressively build the business and I started to get real numbers in December last year, and from there it’s been nothing short of wonderful.”

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The teenager said drop shipping — a method where the seller doesn’t have physical items in stock, instead transferring orders to either a manufacturer, a different retailer, or a wholesaler to then ship the goods directly to the customer — has been the key to his success.

But Mr Bloomfield has always had an entrepreneurial streak.

When he was 12, he sold greeting cards online via a virtual application that allowed customers to choose different options and write their own messages.

He followed that up by creating an online platform which helped patients and doctors keep track of all their health records in one place. [Australia health plan example]

But these days, he’s fully committed to e-commerce.

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“I’m in grade 11 right now so there’s a fine art to time management. I’m working constantly, as much as possible, from 3pm after school to 10pm,” he told news.com.au.

“A lot of kids complain they don’t have time but then they spend hours playing games, talking to their parents, doing their homework and watching TV but I believe you can use every minute of the day effectively, it’s just an excuse to say you don’t have time to start a side business.

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“If you look at how you use your time in the day you could probably find at least a few extra hours.”

After school, Mr Bloomfield plans to skip uni and instead focus on his business full-time.

He hopes to eventually move the business overseas to the US.

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“After I finish school I plan on pursuing the business full-time — I’ve learnt so much in the last two years, it’s phenomenal, and I don’t feel uni is the right step at this point in time,” he said.

“My parents own a business and they’re my inspiration. I’ve seen them working so hard to get results and I’d much rather work for myself because it’s directly proportional, the amount of effort I put in and the reward I get, compared to working for others.”

The sports enthusiast said he spent at least 25 hours during every working week on the business as well as most of his weekends, making sure Facebook ads are working correctly and checking his virtual assistants are filling all orders.

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Mr Bloomfield said he had mentored “hundreds” of people over the years and that he wanted to inspire others to believe in themselves and achieve their goals.

He said other people hoping to launch a business or side hustle should find a good mentor, read books and take online courses to build up their skills.

SKILLS & SCIENCE BEHIND A SUCCESSFUL E-COMMERCE ONLINE STORE VIDEO

On 14th June 2017, Awin brought together their annual series of vertical events to present, ‘The Science Behind Ecommerce’ a one-day affiliate marketing conference debating the science and theory of online marketing, user experience, and website conversion.

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Henry Sapiecha

Meet Lex Greensill and the fintech that’s Australia’s newest $2b success story

A supply chain financing company with its roots in regional Queensland Australia, Greensill, has become the country’s next $1 billion-plus unicorn, thanks to a $US250 million ($336 million) venture capital injection from growth equity firm General Atlantic, which also creates the country’s newest top rich listers.

Queenslander Lex Greensill started his own finance supply-chain company that’s now worth $2.2 billion. John Chapple

Greensill, founded in 2011 in London by Bundaberg-born farmer Lex Greensill, 41, provides businesses in industries from telecommunications to manufacturing with working capital based on their invoices, allowing them to be paid faster and fulfil the work, without shortening payment terms for the buyers.

The capital raise, which is the first for the previously bootstrapped company that had only taken capital from family and friends, values Greensill at $US1.64 billion and makes Mr Greensill and his brother Peter, who runs the family sugar cane and sweet potato farm in Bundaberg, collectively billionaires.

“The business is extraordinarily capital efficient and we’ve invested fully ourselves in growing the business because we wanted to maintain control,” Mr Greensill told The Australian Financial Review.

“The firm is still substantially owned by myself and the staff and I’m very proud of that … Dozens and dozens of our employees have become millionaires on the back of this.

“We weren’t looking to raise at all. General Atlantic approached us and the strength of their experience in multiple markets where we’re looking to grow, combined with the capital and expertise, made it worthwhile. But there are no plans to raise again or do an initial public offering.”

The investment from General Atlantic, which gives it a minority stake in the company, will allow the business to aggressively expand in major markets where it’s only got a small presence – China, India and Brazil – as well as rolling out in Africa.

From Bundaberg QLD to London

Having been raised on his family farm and seeing his parents deal with long payment terms, Mr Greensill worked full time in a law firm after finishing high school and undertook a law degree by correspondence.

After becoming a solicitor, he joined a few start-ups based in Sydney during the dotcom boom, one of which was in supply-chain finance.

This venture ultimately failed and Mr Greensill went on to be involved in a few other start-ups, before making the move to London and eventually starting Morgan Stanley’s supply-chain finance business, before moving to Citibank during the global financial crisis and becoming managing director of its supply-chain finance business for Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

But Mr Greensill, who has also been an adviser to former British prime minister David Cameron and US president Barack Obama, said he became frustrated with the big banks’ inability to adopt new technologies quickly and decided to start his own firm.

“I ultimately decided there was a bigger opportunity outside of the bank because so much of the market was not being served by them and they weren’t adopting technology at the pace I thought they needed to,” he said.

“Our business model is that we work on an industrial scale. We’re low margin and we’re passing through the advantage of the extraordinary access we have to Greensill Bank [in Germany] and capital market financing through to battlers in Australia and the 56 markets we serve.

“Full enrolment online takes under one minute and in terms of accepting legal terms and conditions, it takes just one click. We marry our financial and capital markets technology as one of the biggest bond issuers in Europe, together with access to the enterprise resource planning systems of our customers in order to make credit available.”

‘I’m a farmer at heart’

Greensill bought a German bank in 2013, whose balance sheet it uses to invest in its various programs.

The company is growing at around 300 per cent year-on-year and in Australia it has gone from providing $US800 million in working capital to businesses in 2017 to more than $3 billion in the first six months of 2018.

In 2017 it made a profit of $US32.9 million on $US115.9 million in revenue.

“We see ourselves as the Amazon of the working capital world … We’ve come a long way, but the marketplace we play in is quite enormous,” Mr Greensill said.

“Our market share today is about 0.4 per cent, in a market with the potential size of a $US3.5 trillion asset requirement. That’s the market we’re going after. We want to go from 0.4 per cent to [the full] $US3.5 trillion.”

Mr Greensill’s brother Peter also sits on the board of the company, but day-to-day runs the family farming business, which is separate to Greensill.

While the company was founded in the UK, Greensill is still registered in Bundaberg and Mr Greensill, who was named a Commander of the Order of the British Empire last year, has no intention of ever changing that, admitting he’s still a farmer at heart.

“Bundaberg is my home. It’s where I came from and I visited there about eight times last year with my wife and. We have never considered the thought of changing our roots,” he said.

“I’m a farmer at heart. Whenever I’m home I jump on a tractor and have a play. I don’t think of myself as a corporate titan.”

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Henry Sapiecha

Domino’s boss scores massive multi million $$$$ pay day from cheap pizza

AUSTRALIA’S best-paid CEO has made his fortune selling pizza, it has been revealed.

A new report by the Australian Council of Superannuation Investors (ACSI) named Domino’s Pizza boss Don Meij as the country’s highest-earning CEO, after he took home a whopping $36.84 million last year.

The pizza boss made his dough after he exercised options to acquire shares worth $35.7 million.

Don Meij beat out Westfield’s Peter and Steven Lowy, who made a combined $25.9 million in 2017, and Macquarie’s Nicholas Moore, on $25.19 million, for the top spot.

After the news broke, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the pay packets of our company chief executives were “extraordinarily high”.

“As someone who most of his life has worked in businesses that I’ve only owned or been a partner in, I find the amount, the pay rates for people working as an employee for a lot of big public-listed companies extraordinarily high,” Mr Turnbull told 3AW radio on Tuesday.

He said Mr Meij’s salary “seems like a hell of a lot”.

“They’d have to be extremely productive,” he added.

The new figures reveal Aussie CEO’s are enjoying the fattest pay packets in 17 years.

ASCI chief executive Louise Davidson told the ABC the results showed CEO’s were not with it.

“At a time when public trust in business is at a low ebb and wages growth is weak, board decisions to pay large bonuses just for hitting budget targets rather than exceptional performance are especially tone deaf,” Ms Davidson said.

According to the survey, median-realised pay for ASX 100 chief executives rose 12.4 per cent to $4.36 million while bonus payments rocketed by more than 18 per cent.

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Henry Sapiecha

How this woman woke up with $25m in her bank

 

Clare Wainwright found $25 million accidentally transferred into her bank account

SYDNEY woman Clare Wainwright woke up to find herself $24.5 million richer and her mortgage paid off.

The lawyer first discovered the millions in her account on October 25.

Clare Wainwright found $25 million accidentally transferred into her bank account. Picture: Facebook

In September, NAB sent a letter confirming a direct debit for loan repayments had been set up.

The letter said Ms Wainwright’s monthly repayments would be $25,102,107 – not $2500 – with the next repayment due on October 25.

Her bank NAB first requested $25.1 million from her bank, St George Bank, who then transferred the substantial figure, heavily overdrawing Ms Wainwright’s account.

Despite both banks being contacted about the error, the money is still in Ms Wainwright’s account.

“When NAB accidentally pays out your entire mortgage, and gives you an extra $24.5mil to redraw … do I skip the country??” she jokingly wrote on Facebook.

Ms Wainwright told Fairfax Media that she had not been tempted to spend the millions.

“I’m a lawyer, which is why I haven’t spent the money,” she said. “Mostly because I figured it wouldn’t play out that well trying to play dumb on that.”

Clare Wainwright said she has resisted spending the $25 million.

“I saw it and I thought ‘Oh my gosh, it’s 25 mil’ and I laughed,” she said. “I showed my broker and he said ‘Oh god, I’ll get them to fix it’.”

NAB told her broker that they would be in touch within three business days.

“They obviously don’t understand I could just skip the country,” she said.

Asked how she would spend $25 million, Ms Wainwright said: “Well, if I was allowed to use it, I’d pay off my mortgage and buy another place. Or an island.”

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Henry Sapiecha

Mystery Queenslander wins the complete $40M Oz Lotto jackpot!

UPDATE @ 11.15am: The hunt is on for the winner of last night’s entire $40 million Oz Lotto jackpot prize, with Golden Casket narrowing the search to the tropical Far North Queensland city of Cairns.

Earlier this morning Golden Casket revealed a Queensland entry had won the humungous Oz Lotto prize but with still no sign of the mystery winner, the selling city has now been revealed.

The entry, purchased at a Cairns Golden Casket outlet, was not registered to a Winners Circle Card so the identity of the new multi-millionaire remains a mystery.

Golden Casket is urging all Cairns residents and visitors who purchased a ticket in last night’s Oz Lotto draw to check their tickets.

EARLIER @ 8.30am: One Queenslander won the entire $40 million Oz Lotto jackpot last night, however the identity of the new multi-millionaire remains a mystery as the entry was unregistered.

The Queensland entry was the only division one winner, in what was the third highest Australian lottery jackpot of the year.

Queenslanders who purchased a ticket in the draw are being urged to check their tickets immediately.

Golden Casket spokesperson Matt Hart said he was eagerly waiting for Australia’s newest multi-millionaire to make contact and start the prize claim process.

“With $40 million up for grabs, last night’s Oz Lotto draw was one of the most hotly anticipated draws of the year and one Queensland player won it all!” he said.

“We can’t wait to confirm the humongous prize with our mystery winner! Just imagine how $40 million might change your life and the lives of your nearest and dearest.

“There are 40 million reasons why all Queensland players who had an entry in last night’s draw should check their ticket this morning.

“If you discover you’re holding the division one winning entry, hold on tight to that ticket and phone 131 868 as soon as possible so that we can start the prize claim process!”

We are on the hunt for x1 $40 Million unregistered QLD

Henry Sapiecha

Crystal Car Wash boss Anthony Sahade in a lather over council fine

Crystal Carwash boss Anthony Sahade is used to courtroom soap operas.

Mr Sahade, a Point Piper millionaire who has been in and out of Sydney courts for years over neighbourhood disputes on Australia’s wealthiest street, has most recently been in a lather about a fine from Randwick Council..He was expanding his wash facilites to cater for dogs

The council found an unauthorised dog washing set-up, including a basin and a fence, had been installed at a Crystal Car Wash site in Coogee in March 2015, and ordered its removal.

Mr Sahade then sought and was granted council approval for the dog grooming facility, and refused to pay a $1500 fine for the initial unapproved installation.

The matter went to court and his company Lenjade was convicted and fined $12,000, with $8000 legal costs.

Mr Sahade appealed the decision and last week the Land and Environment Court acquitted Lenjade, ruling there was not enough evidence to prove Mr Sahade directly authorised the development.

During the hearings, Mr Sahade likened managing franchisees to fatherhood.

“I tell my son, ‘You have to be home by 10 o’clock’ but he comes home at 11 o’clock and he uses his discretion and he’s sensible then it’s not a punishable sin. It’s no different to the franchisee having a go at putting a dog wash in to enhance his business,” Mr Sahade said.

“Even though it’s prohibited within the lease it’s not something that’s worth punishing him [for] because he’s doing what’s best for his business and what’s best for his business ultimately profits the whole Crystal Carwash chain.”

It is the latest in a string of legal proceedings involving Mr Sahade.

In 2014, the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal ordered Mr Sahade and his son Victor not to “threaten or act in an aggressive manner” towards their neighbours on a battleaxe block on Wolseley Road.

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Senior member Richard Buckley said that, since May 2005, Mr Sahade’s conduct had been “characterised by a lack of civility, arrogance, threatening behaviour, a disdain for the rights of other lot owners and a disregard for the obligations imposed” by strata laws.

The same year, the Federal Court fined Crystal Carwash for underpaying workers by almost $180,000.

In 2012, Woollahra Council took Mr Sahade to court over a staircase at his mansion, which was built without permission.

Two months later, as Mr Sahade and a carpenter demolished the steps, a physical fight broke out with a neighbour.

CCTV footage of the fight captured Mr Sahade telling the neighbour: “You’re a goner”, various courts heard.

A magistrate dismissed assault charges against the car wash boss.

Henry Sapiecha

‘Stop buying $4 coffees’ & feel ‘Poor Me’ if you want success says young rich lister

A YOUNG rich lister who made his fortune off the back of Australia’s capital city property boom says his generation needs to stop buying $4 coffees and travelling if they want to own a home.

Developer Tim Gurner, 35, is worth nearly half a billion dollars but has delivered a brutal smackdown to some would-be first home buyers struggling to get a toehold in the market.

“When I was buying my first home, I wasn’t buying smashed avocado for 19 bucks and four coffees at $4 each,” he told 60 Minutes in a segment exploring Australia’s housing affordability crisis.

“You have to start to get realistic about your expectations. There is no question we are at a point now where the expectations of younger people are very, very high.

“They want to eat out every day, they want to travel to Europe every year. This generation is watching the Kardashians and thinking that’s normal. Thinking that owning a Bentley is normal, that owning a BMW is normal.

Property developer Tim Gurner made his fortune riding the property boom.News Corp Australia

Mr Gurner, who ranked 157 on this year’s Financial Review Rich List after making $473 million in 10 years He started out by>>>>…MORE

Henry Sapiecha

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