Monthly Archives: September 2018

25 Dying Professions You Should Avoid if you want future paid employment

These professions are on the cards to be of a high risk when staying gainfully employed as laid out by USA info people. Australia can best be aware & mindful of similar trends here.

John Pugliano, author of “The Robots are Coming: A Human’s Survival Guide to Profiting in the Age of Automation,” sees plenty of white collar jobs that will be threatened by automation.

“Bottom line, any routine job that can easily be defined by a mathematical or logic equation will be at risk,” Pugliano said. “Opportunity will be [there] for those that can create new produces/services or solve/fix unexpected problems.”

So your accountant may not have a job in the future, but plastic surgeons and emergency room doctors should do well. And trades people, Pugliano said, will always have work.

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‘A very special moment’: huge gold nugget found in WA’s northern goldfields

A gold nugget dubbed ‘duck’s foot’ worth more than $110,000 has been uncovered in WA’s northern goldfields region.

The 3.23kg nugget contains 2.11kg of gold and amazingly was one of six sizeable nuggets the prospector found during his trip.

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The gold nugget, ‘duck’s foot’ found in remote WA.

Photo: Supplied.

The prospector wished to remain anonymous and did not want to reveal exactly when he found the nugget.

He named the nugget duck’s foot because of its shape.

“When I had finished digging it out, I just thought ‘Oh my god’,” he said.

“There’s an amazing feeling of joy when you find a gold nugget, even a small one, so when I uncovered this one it was a really special moment.

“I have been going to the same spot for years but with a better detector, better technology, I keep finding gold in patches I’ve been over many times. I can’t believe the amount I’ve left behind.”

The man, who is retired, camps on-site for weeks or months at a time.

He was using an Australian-built metal detector from Australian company Minelab.

The prospector’s first strike was on the second day, which was a nugget big enough to pay for the entire expedition.

“That meant the pressure was off and I could unwind a bit. I started looking for deep signals in ground I’d gone over before,” he said.

“When I heard that signal, I knew it could be something big.

“It was pretty deep at about 800mm in clay soil so it took more than two hours of careful digging to get it out.”

Despite the great pay day the prospector has no plans to stop.

“I have always said to do this you need ruthless optimism and a happy heart. Why would I stop?” he said.

Airleg driller Henry Dole was on shift when his team unearthed two huge specimens at RNC’s Beta Hunt mine site in Kambalda earlier this month. Picture: Kelsey Reid / Kalgoorlie Miner.Source:Supplied

Earlier this month, Canadian gold mining company RNC Minerals announced it had found a whopping 9250 ounces of gold worth $C15 million ($A15.9 million) at its Beta Hunt gold mine, also in the Goldfields near Kambalda, in just one week.

That included two massive sized specimens weighing 95kg and 63kg with a combined estimated gold content of more than 4000 ounces, which President Mark Selby said could rank among the biggest ever discovered

On Thursday, the company provided an updated estimate from the discovery, dubbed the ‘Father’s Day Vein’, saying it had produced more than 24,000 ounces worth more than $C38 million ($A40.3 million).

Originally published as Another huge gold find in WA

GET YOUR FREE PDF GUIDE ON THE GOLDFIELDS OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA HERE

RELATED LINKS & INFO

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www.worldwidediamonds.info

www.sunblestproducts.com

www.youbeautute.com.au

www.profitcentre.net

Henry Sapiecha

Dave Hughes responds to critics who said he spent far too much on a house from The Block.HA-HA SAYS THE CLOWN

DAVE Hughes is requesting an apology from  the property experts who criticised the amount he paid for one of The Block houses last year 2017.

The comedian dropped $3.067 million ($447,000 over the reserve) on the five-bedroom home in Elsternwick in southeast Melbourne that was renovated by Josh Barker and Elyse Knowles.

RELATED: How Hughes went from being on the dole to one of Australia’s most high-paid entertainers

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“I copped so much flak for that,” Hughes said yesterday on his Hit Network drive show with Kate Langbroek. “It was ridiculous and it’s gone on and on and on.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“A lot of experts had their say about my purchase … There are articles that have been written all year having a go at me. One article from one mob called Property One or something, they had a dinner party discussion about how much I overpaid for it.”

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

Reading from the article, Hughes said, “Based on our assessment we think Hughesy has paid somewhere between $417,000 and $517,000 too much. We’re confident it’s closer to the $500,000 level.”

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

The comedian even invited a property expert onto his Network Ten show, Hughesy, We Have a Problem, who told him he’d paid around $250,000 too much for the block house.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

But now, 10 months on, Hughes is adamant the experts were wrong based on the sale of yet another Block house on the weekend.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“The house next to the house I bought, Sticks and Wombat’s house, got sold over the weekend,” he said on radio yesterday.

“Sticks and Wombat’s house got sold just the other day … for $180,000 more than it sold for on the TV less than a year ago,” Hughes stated.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“They got $2.83 million on the weekend and with my house being worth more than theirs, because it’s a better house in a better location, Katie, I would like an apology,” he said to Langbroek who also criticised the amount he paid.

Hughes said that the house he bought was better than Sticks and Wombat’s house because his was on the northern end. He also added that his house came with $200,000 worth of furniture whereas Sticks and Wombat’s house was sold unfurnished on the weekend.

“You’ve got to admit that that is pretty good justification,” Hughes said, before giving a shout-out to his bank.

“I’d like the bank to apologise also because they valued my house a lot less when I tried to get the loan. They’re fools! I told the bank they’re idiots!”

Hughes is currently renting out the property in Elsternwick but he did confess to Triple M’s Hot Breakfast in January that it took him a while to locate tenants.

“I had trouble renting it,” he said. “It took a fair while.

“At one point the real estate agent rang me and said, ‘someone wants to move in but they’ve got a dog’. I felt like saying, ‘I don’t care whether they’ve got a meth lab’.

“It’s a little dog and that’s fine. They put in their own doggie door.”

According to realestate.com.au, rent for the five-bedroom house would be somewhere between $2500-$3000 per week.

RELATED TOPICS & LINKS

www.australianmortgageloans.com.au

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www.realestate-au.info

www.auctiontraders.net

Henry Sapiecha

 

Australian cupcake mogul Katelyn Matheson on track to make fortune — before her 21st birthday

WHEN Katelyn Matheson was 18, she decided to earn a little extra pocket money by selling homemade cupcakes at her local farmers’ market.

She made a few hundred dollars after selling 150 cakes after her first day — a fortune for a teenage TAFE cookery student.

But word of mouth spread, and within days she was being inundated with orders and requests via her Facebook page.

Soon, she was baking 5000 cupcakes a week to keep up with demand, and her business, Cake Creations by Kate, was born. Support this industrious girl & buy her products Australia.

“I was still living with mum at the time and I did it all in her kitchen — poor thing; I took over the house,” she said.

“It turned into a massive thing. On Friday nights there used to be cars everywhere on our street with people lined up at our door to pick up orders.

“It started out as a way to earn a little bit of extra money while I was studying but all of a sudden, people were asking about the cupcakes non-stop. I didn’t predict it would get this big.”

Ms Matheson remembers setting up trestle tables throughout her mother’s house one night to hold 4000 cupcakes that had been ordered — that was her mother’s breaking point, and the teen realised it was time to take the business to the next level.

She decided to lease a shop at her local shopping centre, but centre management asked her to trial a temporary, pop-up store first as they were concerned the then-19-year-old was too young to handle the responsibilities of a long-term lease.

They shouldn’t have been.

There was a “20m line” of eager customers waiting from the moment the store opened — and Ms Matheson had completely sold out within an hour-and-a-half.

She signed a lease almost immediately and today Ms Matheson runs two stores with a third set to open in inner-Melbourne’s QV centre this month, and with more pop-up stores to follow.

She’s also established partnerships with corporate and wholesale clients including ANZ, Crown Casino, Myer, NAB, Optus and Telstra and has branched into wedding cakes and party favours as well.

🌸
I’m the luckiest girl is the world to have this amazing lady as my Mum, she is always so caring and puts everyone before herself, she is my biggest fab, she always supports me no matter what & her kind heart and generous natures makes everyone smile around her. Thank you Mum for being the best Mum & I hope all the Mums have a great day and get spoilt with love today

And it seems the cupcake business is a lucrative one — Ms Matheson is on track to make $1.6 million by the end of 2018, well before her 21st birthday.

She said the degree of her success had been “crazy” — but insists getting rich was never her objective.

“It’s absolutely never been my goal and I’ve never lost sight of my passion on this whole journey,” she said.

“I don’t wake up thinking about money. People say I must love making lots of money on big days like Father’s Day or Mother’s Day, but that’s not my goal — I love what I do, creating desserts people love, and I never let money get in the way.

“But it’s nice to be so young and have the opportunity to make some money and be successful. I never came from a really wealthy family and my family always taught me the importance of genuine hard work.”

Ms Matheson said her success had happened so quickly she has had little chance to enjoy it, working around the clock and investing a lot of her revenue back into her company through kitchen supplies and equipment to streamline the business.

And she stressed her phenomenal success has also come with many challenges.

“It definitely hasn’t all been smooth sailing. It sounds like it’s all rainbows and unicorns but it has come with a lot of hardship. Especially being so young, there are challenges when you start making money — I was investing every single cent into new equipment, with one machine costing $35,000,” she said.

“And it becomes harder the more staff you employ. Next week our 20th staff member will come on board and it is hard to manage so many different people, but I’m learning to be versatile and a strong, independent woman.”

She said the secret ingredient to her success has been hard work, quality ingredients and treating staff well.

Ms Matheson’s signature cupcakes include Rainbow, Salted Caramel, Triple Chocolate and Jam Donut.

RELATED LINKS BELOW

www.goodgirlsgo.com

www.foodpassions.net

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www.sunblestproducts.com

www.ozrural.com.au

www.profitcentre.net

www.auctioncentre.net

Henry Sapiecha