25 Dying Professions You Should Avoid if you want future paid employment

These professions are on the cards to be of a high risk when staying gainfully employed as laid out by USA info people. Australia can best be aware & mindful of similar trends here.

John Pugliano, author of “The Robots are Coming: A Human’s Survival Guide to Profiting in the Age of Automation,” sees plenty of white collar jobs that will be threatened by automation.

“Bottom line, any routine job that can easily be defined by a mathematical or logic equation will be at risk,” Pugliano said. “Opportunity will be [there] for those that can create new produces/services or solve/fix unexpected problems.”

So your accountant may not have a job in the future, but plastic surgeons and emergency room doctors should do well. And trades people, Pugliano said, will always have work.

Pugliano and other experts contacted by Work + Money offered professions to avoid (not because they will completely disappear, but because the job market will likely be in a state of decline) while also providing alternatives where skills utilized in those dying professions can be applied for a more secure employment future.

Maybe Even Primary Care Physicians?
1 of 25

As Pugliano said, the primary care physician you go to for your annual physical or when you’re feeling under the weather may be going the way of doctors that make house calls. Routine diagnostics for things like strep throat and ear infections will be replaced with cheap, in-home tests.

“The alternative will be for doctors to spend less time diagnosing illness and more time on addressing human factors that produce better wellness outcomes: counseling for obesity and addiction, performance coaching, or addressing urgent conditions like emergency room doctors or first responders,” he said.

Don’t worry,  artificial intelligence (AI) isn’t about to replace your doctor anytime soon, but it may shift the job market and change the day-to-day work for many physicians.

www.newcures.info

Routine Architect
2 of 25

Jim Molinelli is a licensed architect who has taught architecture at Texas A&M University. But he doesn’t see a bright future for people looking to get into the field.

To become a licensed architect requires five or six years of college and another three to five years of internships. “All that to earn far less than the public assumes, and provide a service that is not exclusive or in demand,” Molinelli said.

Molinelli points out that a lot of the services architects provide can be provided by people who do not have licenses.

“In the corporate world, engineers can do the same tasks, and in a residential application, anyone can draw plans for new homes or for remodeling permits as long as they comply with the current codes,” he said. “With the ability to do it yourself, or hire other non-licensed alternatives for work on housing, the public almost never sees a value in spending to hire an architect.”  www.handyhomehints.com

Detective
3 of 25

Surveillance cameras, spyware and DNA databanks make it easier to solve crimes, so Pugliano in his book on the coming age of robots said he sees the decline of the traditional gumshoe detective depicted for generations in mystery novels.

While the BLS isn’t predicting a decrease in private eyes or investigators soon, nor for architects or physicians, which are the next two professions on this list, our experts predict these professions will have to change drastically to stay relevant.

Pugliano predicts police work in the future will focus more on criminal rehabilitation and reducing recidivism and less on solving crimes.  www.ispysite.com 

www.intelagencies.com

Print Binding and Finishing Workers
4 of 25

While this job is expected to diminish at a slower pace in the coming decade than it did in the past decade, it’s still not a good time to be in the printing business.

Hardest hit in the industry are the people who bind and finish books, thanks to increased automation and decreased demand.

By 2026, the number of people working in binding and finishing will drop by 10.6 percent, according to BLS.   www.itbooksolutions.com

Door-To-Door Salespeople
5 of 25

It really is the death of the salesman: About one in five of these jobs will be gone by 2026, according to BLS. Targeted, online advertising is far more efficient than having someone brave the elements, over-protective dogs and customers who just aren’t interested.

There are, however, still plenty of opportunities for salespeople. Insurance sales agents, on average, earn close to double what door-to-door salesmen earn, and their numbers are growing: the number of people working in the field will expand by 10.6 percent to 651,215 by 2026, according to BLS.   www.auctiontraders.net

Furniture Finisher
6 of 25

These craftsman shape, finish and refinish damaged and worn furniture. But with furniture prices constantly declining it’s now often cheaper to replace than it is to repair a broken chair or table.

Furniture finishers who work in production — the making of new furniture — are no better off as the process becomes automated, moved overseas or both.

BLS projects the number of furniture finishers to fall 0.7 percent to 20,113 by 2026.

www.handyhomehints.com

Textile Machine Workers
7 of 25

Another job that requires minimal education, the low-skilled machine working is increasingly being done overseas. The decline affects setters, operators and tenders of textile knitting and weaving machines.

But workers who have slightly more specialized skills, like skilled manufacturers, are seeing a slight increase in the number of opportunities available to them.

An even better option? Train to be a machinist. The number of people who use lathes, milling machines and grinders to make bolts and other parts are expected to see the number of available jobs grow by 12.9 percent by 2026.   www.fcci.com.au

Jeweller
8 of 25

With more and more jewellery being produced overseas, there are fewer and fewer jewellers working in the U.S. BLS projects an 11 percent decline in the number of jewellers by 2024.

www.www-gems.com     www.worldwidediamonds.info   www.gem-creations.com

Newspaper Reporter
9 of 25

Given that circulation has been dropping for 17 straight years and Sunday circulation of the nation’s newspapers are at their lowest levels since 1945 — when there were significantly fewer people — and it’s no wonder that the people who fill the paper with news are losing their jobs.

Look for nearly one in 10 reporters to lose their jobs in the next 10 years, according to BLS.

www.acbocallcentre.com     www.austelagencies.com    www.crimefiles.net

Fast Food Cook
10 of 25

The promise of technology is that it will make low-paying jobs obsolete. And nothing is more symbolic of the bottom of the employment food chain than fast food cook, which is one of the few jobs in our list that require less than a high school diploma.

BLS says there will be about 511,400 fast food cooks working in the U.S. in 2020, down 3.6 percent from 2010.

The reason? Fast food is increasingly becoming an automated industry. The chains have found it cheaper to prepare food off site and simply have employees reheat it in their stores.

That was unthinkable in most fast food businesses even a decade ago, but food technology has advanced to the point where the microwaved version doesn’t lack the flavor of the cooked-on-site version.    www.foodpassions.net       www.sunblestproducts.com

Farmers and Ranchers
11 of 25

The number of agricultural workers is expected to decline 8 percent from 2010 levels by 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

It’s not because people are eating less, but because farmers are getting more efficient, replacing workers with machinery and getting bigger yields out of smaller plots of land.

www.ozrural.com.au   www.frasercoastcentral.com.au

Telephone Switchboard Operators
12 of 25

Yes, there are still a few people who work as operators, but their numbers have been declining for decades and are projected to fall another 33 percent in the next 10 years.

By 2020, there will be just 109,300 people working as switchboard operators.

Once again, blame technology. We even heard about an office that is using Amazon’s Alexa to direct phone calls to the right recipient. Texting, voice mail and other A.I.-enhanced systems could make this job obsolete even sooner than projected.   www.freephonelink.net

Data Entry Clerks
13 of 25

These workers are expected to be the hardest hit in an overall decline in opportunities for the broader category of office and administrative workers. Once again, we can thank – or blame – technology.

Word processing, voicemail and the internet means we end up doing a lot of the tasks that once would have been delegated to an administrative assistant.

The profession had actually been in decline for several years, and then saw a rapid increase in decline during the recession. The economic recovery hasn’t been applied to people in this line of work: BLS projects 13,200 typists to lose their jobs between 2010 and 2020, and 15,900 data entry clerks to lose their jobs in the same time frame. www.itservicemanuals.com

Photo Processor
14 of 25

Digital photography continues to make job hunting tough for people who work with film. There are just 23,853 photo processors remaining in the U.S., according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and their ranks are expected to decrease by 19.7 percent by 2026.

Fear not, shutterbugs: The need for photographers is on the increase. That profession is expected to increase by 12 percent to 155,286 jobs by 2026. Portrait and commercial photographers – the people who take photos for businesses and advertising firms – are expected to see the greatest growth over the next decade. www.myquickpics.com

Postal Workers
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The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts the number of postal workers, including mail carriers and clerks, will drop by 28 percent by 2026. Online bill paying and keeping in touch with friends on social media are the biggest culprits in the dreary outlook for workers in the United States Postal Service. Mail sorters will be hardest hit, with a drop of 50 percent in available jobs, according to BLS.

Yes, many online retailers use the postal service to deliver packages, but that demand doesn’t make up fully for other areas of decline.  According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, “Automated sorting systems, cluster mailboxes and tight budgets will adversely affect employment.”

Last year, the postal service delivered 149 billion pieces of mail, down from 212 billion a decade earlier. And if you think Amazon will save the U.S. Postal service, think again. The company is aggressively building out its own network of delivery drivers in an effort to reduce costs and increase the availability of same-day delivery to better compete with brick-and-mortar retailers.

www.escrowpost.com

Floral Designers
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The number of flower arrangers fell 25.6 percent between 2005 and 2015 and is projected to fall another 16.6 percent between 2015 and 2025. Blame the internet and its burgeoning business of flower delivery, as well as a push by supermarkets to bolster their floral departments and sell loose flowers directly to customers.

The visual design skills used by floral designers, however, are easily transferable to the higher-paying professions of interior design and merchandise display, both of which are growing.

www.pythonjungle.com   www.sunblestproducts.com  www.mylove-au.com

Financial Planners
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Tasks once performed by low-level retail financial planners are quickly being outsourced to planning software, apps, robo advisors and investing algorithms, Pugliano says.

But, he added, an “opportunity remains for those than can implement market-timing strategies along with asset protection and risk mitigation.”  www.profitcentre.net

IT Guys
18 of 25

Or, as they’re also known, system and server administrators.

With so much of computing becoming cloud-based, the IT guy who patrolled your office is becoming less and less relevant in today’s workforce, says Nicholas C. Fiorentino, chief executive at CrediReady. The change is already happening at smaller businesses, which find it cheaper and more efficient to outsource the work.

“The good news is, it is creating the opportunity for programmers, freelancers and system administrators willing to pivot to manage their client servers remotely and profitably, and at better scale,” Fiorentino said.  www.itbooksolutions.com      www.itservicemanuals.com

Casino Cashier
19 of 25

There are plenty of opportunities in gaming as more and more states legalize gambling, but cashier is not one of them. Casinos are increasingly turning to automated machines to reduce labor costs, meaning the man or woman in the casino cage is going the way of the one-armed-bandit-style slot machines.

The growth in the industry is expected to fuel demand for dealers. But there is a downside: While the number of dealers is expected to grow by 8.7 percent over the next ten years, they earn significantly less than cashiers ($19,552 per year versus $22,970).  www.profitcentre.net

Middle Managers
20 of 25

The paper pushing done by middle managers is increasingly being done by enterprise software like Oracle and Salesforce. People in those jobs, Pugliano said, should focus on revenue-producing functions like client relationships, sales or new product development.

www.auctiontraders.net   www.buysellswapsite.com   www.www-trader.com

Broadcasters
21 of 25

One in 10 of the nation’s 33,202 radio and television announcers are expected to see their jobs disappear by 2026. Consolidation in the industry, as well as increased use of syndicated content, is fueling the decline. There’s also the explosion of streaming music services. More and more listeners prefer that over their local, drive-time disc jockey.

Party DJs however, are seeing an uptick in business with demand for their services projected to grow about six percent by 2026. And they earn about the same – $32,000 – as their on-air counterparts.  www.mymusicfiles.net   www.mymoviefiles.com

Lawyer
22 of 25

The world will always have lawyers, but a lot of the work they do — or used to do — is quickly being taken over by technology.

Pugliano notes that a lot of the work once done by case researchers can now be done with increasingly sophisticated algorithms. His recommendation for aspiring legal eagles is to focus on specializing in non-routine human emotion intense areas, like jury selection or witness profiling.  www.crimefiles.net   www.scamsfakes.com   www.intelagencies.com   www.policesearch.net    www.ispysite.com

Bookkeeper
24 of 25

Blame artificial intelligence for the decline of the bookkeeping profession, says Dmytro Arshynov of DMA Financial Management LLC in New York. Sites like QuickBooks Online and Receipt Bank can automatically download your bank account information and prepare a simple Form 1040 and Schedule form.

With the technology constantly improving, Arshynov believes the job of bookkeeping will be eliminated within a decade and replaced with automated technologies.

www.itbooksolutions.com   www.fcci.com.au   www.profitcentre.net

Mortgage Brokers
24 of 25

The number of traditional mortgage brokers dropped by 80 percent during the Great Recession, and for those who were able to keep their jobs, average salaries dropped by 30 percent. And the profession hasn’t really recovered, thanks to online brokers like Rocket Mortgage and Guaranteed Rate that make getting an online quote quick, according to Timothy G. Wiedman, a retired professor of management and human resources at Doane University in Nebraska.

Add in that Millennials, the home buyers of the future, have grown up doing everything online, and the outlook for mortgage brokers looks bleak at best.

“However, many of the numeric and financial skills possessed by folks who might be attracted to that profession could be utilized elsewhere in the financial services industry,” Wiedman said. “So, by earning different professional credentials, those folks won’t starve.”

www.australianmortgageloans.com.au   www.profitcentre.net 

www.creditcardseasy.net

Travel Agent
25 of 25

Thanks to online travel booking sites, everyone is their own personal travel agent these days. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that the number of travel agents will decline by 12 percent over the next ten years.

There is, however, an alternative career on the rise. The Occupational Outlook Handbook predicts an increase in the need for people who are experts in specific destinations or particular types of travellers. That could include corporate, luxury, study abroad or travelers over 55.

www.oz-accom.com
www.ozgetawaytours.com

 

 

‘A very special moment’: huge gold nugget found in WA’s northern goldfields

A gold nugget dubbed ‘duck’s foot’ worth more than $110,000 has been uncovered in WA’s northern goldfields region.

The 3.23kg nugget contains 2.11kg of gold and amazingly was one of six sizeable nuggets the prospector found during his trip.

ooo

The gold nugget, ‘duck’s foot’ found in remote WA.

Photo: Supplied.

The prospector wished to remain anonymous and did not want to reveal exactly when he found the nugget.

He named the nugget duck’s foot because of its shape.

“When I had finished digging it out, I just thought ‘Oh my god’,” he said.

“There’s an amazing feeling of joy when you find a gold nugget, even a small one, so when I uncovered this one it was a really special moment.

“I have been going to the same spot for years but with a better detector, better technology, I keep finding gold in patches I’ve been over many times. I can’t believe the amount I’ve left behind.”

The man, who is retired, camps on-site for weeks or months at a time.

He was using an Australian-built metal detector from Australian company Minelab.

The prospector’s first strike was on the second day, which was a nugget big enough to pay for the entire expedition.

“That meant the pressure was off and I could unwind a bit. I started looking for deep signals in ground I’d gone over before,” he said.

“When I heard that signal, I knew it could be something big.

“It was pretty deep at about 800mm in clay soil so it took more than two hours of careful digging to get it out.”

Despite the great pay day the prospector has no plans to stop.

“I have always said to do this you need ruthless optimism and a happy heart. Why would I stop?” he said.

Airleg driller Henry Dole was on shift when his team unearthed two huge specimens at RNC’s Beta Hunt mine site in Kambalda earlier this month. Picture: Kelsey Reid / Kalgoorlie Miner.Source:Supplied

Earlier this month, Canadian gold mining company RNC Minerals announced it had found a whopping 9250 ounces of gold worth $C15 million ($A15.9 million) at its Beta Hunt gold mine, also in the Goldfields near Kambalda, in just one week.

That included two massive sized specimens weighing 95kg and 63kg with a combined estimated gold content of more than 4000 ounces, which President Mark Selby said could rank among the biggest ever discovered

On Thursday, the company provided an updated estimate from the discovery, dubbed the ‘Father’s Day Vein’, saying it had produced more than 24,000 ounces worth more than $C38 million ($A40.3 million).

Originally published as Another huge gold find in WA

GET YOUR FREE PDF GUIDE ON THE GOLDFIELDS OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA HERE

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Henry Sapiecha

Dave Hughes responds to critics who said he spent far too much on a house from The Block.HA-HA SAYS THE CLOWN

DAVE Hughes is requesting an apology from  the property experts who criticised the amount he paid for one of The Block houses last year 2017.

The comedian dropped $3.067 million ($447,000 over the reserve) on the five-bedroom home in Elsternwick in southeast Melbourne that was renovated by Josh Barker and Elyse Knowles.

RELATED: How Hughes went from being on the dole to one of Australia’s most high-paid entertainers

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“I copped so much flak for that,” Hughes said yesterday on his Hit Network drive show with Kate Langbroek. “It was ridiculous and it’s gone on and on and on.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“A lot of experts had their say about my purchase … There are articles that have been written all year having a go at me. One article from one mob called Property One or something, they had a dinner party discussion about how much I overpaid for it.”

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

Reading from the article, Hughes said, “Based on our assessment we think Hughesy has paid somewhere between $417,000 and $517,000 too much. We’re confident it’s closer to the $500,000 level.”

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

The comedian even invited a property expert onto his Network Ten show, Hughesy, We Have a Problem, who told him he’d paid around $250,000 too much for the block house.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

But now, 10 months on, Hughes is adamant the experts were wrong based on the sale of yet another Block house on the weekend.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“The house next to the house I bought, Sticks and Wombat’s house, got sold over the weekend,” he said on radio yesterday.

“Sticks and Wombat’s house got sold just the other day … for $180,000 more than it sold for on the TV less than a year ago,” Hughes stated.

The Block house by Josh and Elyse at 46a Regent St Elsternwick.

“They got $2.83 million on the weekend and with my house being worth more than theirs, because it’s a better house in a better location, Katie, I would like an apology,” he said to Langbroek who also criticised the amount he paid.

Hughes said that the house he bought was better than Sticks and Wombat’s house because his was on the northern end. He also added that his house came with $200,000 worth of furniture whereas Sticks and Wombat’s house was sold unfurnished on the weekend.

“You’ve got to admit that that is pretty good justification,” Hughes said, before giving a shout-out to his bank.

“I’d like the bank to apologise also because they valued my house a lot less when I tried to get the loan. They’re fools! I told the bank they’re idiots!”

Hughes is currently renting out the property in Elsternwick but he did confess to Triple M’s Hot Breakfast in January that it took him a while to locate tenants.

“I had trouble renting it,” he said. “It took a fair while.

“At one point the real estate agent rang me and said, ‘someone wants to move in but they’ve got a dog’. I felt like saying, ‘I don’t care whether they’ve got a meth lab’.

“It’s a little dog and that’s fine. They put in their own doggie door.”

According to realestate.com.au, rent for the five-bedroom house would be somewhere between $2500-$3000 per week.

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www.realestate-au.info

www.auctiontraders.net

Henry Sapiecha

 

Australian cupcake mogul Katelyn Matheson on track to make fortune — before her 21st birthday

WHEN Katelyn Matheson was 18, she decided to earn a little extra pocket money by selling homemade cupcakes at her local farmers’ market.

She made a few hundred dollars after selling 150 cakes after her first day — a fortune for a teenage TAFE cookery student.

But word of mouth spread, and within days she was being inundated with orders and requests via her Facebook page.

Soon, she was baking 5000 cupcakes a week to keep up with demand, and her business, Cake Creations by Kate, was born. Support this industrious girl & buy her products Australia.

“I was still living with mum at the time and I did it all in her kitchen — poor thing; I took over the house,” she said.

“It turned into a massive thing. On Friday nights there used to be cars everywhere on our street with people lined up at our door to pick up orders.

“It started out as a way to earn a little bit of extra money while I was studying but all of a sudden, people were asking about the cupcakes non-stop. I didn’t predict it would get this big.”

Ms Matheson remembers setting up trestle tables throughout her mother’s house one night to hold 4000 cupcakes that had been ordered — that was her mother’s breaking point, and the teen realised it was time to take the business to the next level.

She decided to lease a shop at her local shopping centre, but centre management asked her to trial a temporary, pop-up store first as they were concerned the then-19-year-old was too young to handle the responsibilities of a long-term lease.

They shouldn’t have been.

There was a “20m line” of eager customers waiting from the moment the store opened — and Ms Matheson had completely sold out within an hour-and-a-half.

She signed a lease almost immediately and today Ms Matheson runs two stores with a third set to open in inner-Melbourne’s QV centre this month, and with more pop-up stores to follow.

She’s also established partnerships with corporate and wholesale clients including ANZ, Crown Casino, Myer, NAB, Optus and Telstra and has branched into wedding cakes and party favours as well.

🌸
I’m the luckiest girl is the world to have this amazing lady as my Mum, she is always so caring and puts everyone before herself, she is my biggest fab, she always supports me no matter what & her kind heart and generous natures makes everyone smile around her. Thank you Mum for being the best Mum & I hope all the Mums have a great day and get spoilt with love today

And it seems the cupcake business is a lucrative one — Ms Matheson is on track to make $1.6 million by the end of 2018, well before her 21st birthday.

She said the degree of her success had been “crazy” — but insists getting rich was never her objective.

“It’s absolutely never been my goal and I’ve never lost sight of my passion on this whole journey,” she said.

“I don’t wake up thinking about money. People say I must love making lots of money on big days like Father’s Day or Mother’s Day, but that’s not my goal — I love what I do, creating desserts people love, and I never let money get in the way.

“But it’s nice to be so young and have the opportunity to make some money and be successful. I never came from a really wealthy family and my family always taught me the importance of genuine hard work.”

Ms Matheson said her success had happened so quickly she has had little chance to enjoy it, working around the clock and investing a lot of her revenue back into her company through kitchen supplies and equipment to streamline the business.

And she stressed her phenomenal success has also come with many challenges.

“It definitely hasn’t all been smooth sailing. It sounds like it’s all rainbows and unicorns but it has come with a lot of hardship. Especially being so young, there are challenges when you start making money — I was investing every single cent into new equipment, with one machine costing $35,000,” she said.

“And it becomes harder the more staff you employ. Next week our 20th staff member will come on board and it is hard to manage so many different people, but I’m learning to be versatile and a strong, independent woman.”

She said the secret ingredient to her success has been hard work, quality ingredients and treating staff well.

Ms Matheson’s signature cupcakes include Rainbow, Salted Caramel, Triple Chocolate and Jam Donut.

RELATED LINKS BELOW

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www.auctioncentre.net

Henry Sapiecha

The Queensland teenager earning a small fortune through e-commerce side hustle

DURING the day, Brisbane Qld Australia teen Jack Bloomfield heads off to do school like most other 16-year-olds.

But when he gets home, the Year 11 student immediately jumps on his computer to manage his e-commerce side hustle business.

It’s a venture that’s paying off far greater than the part-time jobs most other teens have on their resumes.

Since launching his parent company BloomVentures at age 15, Mr Bloomfield now operates a number of e-commerce stores, including Best Bargain Club, which all sell a variety of different products from novelty items to skincare products online.

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While he declined to reveal his company’s total revenue income and stressed that his earnings varied from week to week, Mr Bloomfield said that during a strong period, he was he was making “north of $2900 a day”, and bank documents revealed to news.com.au supported  his claim.

“Currently, I am turning over just north of $2900 a day through multiple ventures but primarily Shopify and e-commerce,” he said.

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“Between the age of 14 and 15 I was trialling different side hustles like Forex trading. I made a few thousand dollars here and there but I got my big break when I was 15.

“I got into the world of e-commerce, and I began selling carbon fibre money clips … then I scaled it all the way up through a method called drop-shipping.

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“I now have over five e-commerce stores turning over thousands of dollars per day … Through that time I have scaled my personal brand up and I now have more than 12,000 followers on Instagram with hundreds of connections within Australia and overseas.

“Last year I started to aggressively build the business and I started to get real numbers in December last year, and from there it’s been nothing short of wonderful.”

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The teenager said drop shipping — a method where the seller doesn’t have physical items in stock, instead transferring orders to either a manufacturer, a different retailer, or a wholesaler to then ship the goods directly to the customer — has been the key to his success.

But Mr Bloomfield has always had an entrepreneurial streak.

When he was 12, he sold greeting cards online via a virtual application that allowed customers to choose different options and write their own messages.

He followed that up by creating an online platform which helped patients and doctors keep track of all their health records in one place. [Australia health plan example]

But these days, he’s fully committed to e-commerce.

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“I’m in grade 11 right now so there’s a fine art to time management. I’m working constantly, as much as possible, from 3pm after school to 10pm,” he told news.com.au.

“A lot of kids complain they don’t have time but then they spend hours playing games, talking to their parents, doing their homework and watching TV but I believe you can use every minute of the day effectively, it’s just an excuse to say you don’t have time to start a side business.

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“If you look at how you use your time in the day you could probably find at least a few extra hours.”

After school, Mr Bloomfield plans to skip uni and instead focus on his business full-time.

He hopes to eventually move the business overseas to the US.

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“After I finish school I plan on pursuing the business full-time — I’ve learnt so much in the last two years, it’s phenomenal, and I don’t feel uni is the right step at this point in time,” he said.

“My parents own a business and they’re my inspiration. I’ve seen them working so hard to get results and I’d much rather work for myself because it’s directly proportional, the amount of effort I put in and the reward I get, compared to working for others.”

The sports enthusiast said he spent at least 25 hours during every working week on the business as well as most of his weekends, making sure Facebook ads are working correctly and checking his virtual assistants are filling all orders.

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Mr Bloomfield said he had mentored “hundreds” of people over the years and that he wanted to inspire others to believe in themselves and achieve their goals.

He said other people hoping to launch a business or side hustle should find a good mentor, read books and take online courses to build up their skills.

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On 14th June 2017, Awin brought together their annual series of vertical events to present, ‘The Science Behind Ecommerce’ a one-day affiliate marketing conference debating the science and theory of online marketing, user experience, and website conversion.

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Henry Sapiecha

Meet Lex Greensill and the fintech that’s Australia’s newest $2b success story

A supply chain financing company with its roots in regional Queensland Australia, Greensill, has become the country’s next $1 billion-plus unicorn, thanks to a $US250 million ($336 million) venture capital injection from growth equity firm General Atlantic, which also creates the country’s newest top rich listers.

Queenslander Lex Greensill started his own finance supply-chain company that’s now worth $2.2 billion. John Chapple

Greensill, founded in 2011 in London by Bundaberg-born farmer Lex Greensill, 41, provides businesses in industries from telecommunications to manufacturing with working capital based on their invoices, allowing them to be paid faster and fulfil the work, without shortening payment terms for the buyers.

The capital raise, which is the first for the previously bootstrapped company that had only taken capital from family and friends, values Greensill at $US1.64 billion and makes Mr Greensill and his brother Peter, who runs the family sugar cane and sweet potato farm in Bundaberg, collectively billionaires.

“The business is extraordinarily capital efficient and we’ve invested fully ourselves in growing the business because we wanted to maintain control,” Mr Greensill told The Australian Financial Review.

“The firm is still substantially owned by myself and the staff and I’m very proud of that … Dozens and dozens of our employees have become millionaires on the back of this.

“We weren’t looking to raise at all. General Atlantic approached us and the strength of their experience in multiple markets where we’re looking to grow, combined with the capital and expertise, made it worthwhile. But there are no plans to raise again or do an initial public offering.”

The investment from General Atlantic, which gives it a minority stake in the company, will allow the business to aggressively expand in major markets where it’s only got a small presence – China, India and Brazil – as well as rolling out in Africa.

From Bundaberg QLD to London

Having been raised on his family farm and seeing his parents deal with long payment terms, Mr Greensill worked full time in a law firm after finishing high school and undertook a law degree by correspondence.

After becoming a solicitor, he joined a few start-ups based in Sydney during the dotcom boom, one of which was in supply-chain finance.

This venture ultimately failed and Mr Greensill went on to be involved in a few other start-ups, before making the move to London and eventually starting Morgan Stanley’s supply-chain finance business, before moving to Citibank during the global financial crisis and becoming managing director of its supply-chain finance business for Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

But Mr Greensill, who has also been an adviser to former British prime minister David Cameron and US president Barack Obama, said he became frustrated with the big banks’ inability to adopt new technologies quickly and decided to start his own firm.

“I ultimately decided there was a bigger opportunity outside of the bank because so much of the market was not being served by them and they weren’t adopting technology at the pace I thought they needed to,” he said.

“Our business model is that we work on an industrial scale. We’re low margin and we’re passing through the advantage of the extraordinary access we have to Greensill Bank [in Germany] and capital market financing through to battlers in Australia and the 56 markets we serve.

“Full enrolment online takes under one minute and in terms of accepting legal terms and conditions, it takes just one click. We marry our financial and capital markets technology as one of the biggest bond issuers in Europe, together with access to the enterprise resource planning systems of our customers in order to make credit available.”

‘I’m a farmer at heart’

Greensill bought a German bank in 2013, whose balance sheet it uses to invest in its various programs.

The company is growing at around 300 per cent year-on-year and in Australia it has gone from providing $US800 million in working capital to businesses in 2017 to more than $3 billion in the first six months of 2018.

In 2017 it made a profit of $US32.9 million on $US115.9 million in revenue.

“We see ourselves as the Amazon of the working capital world … We’ve come a long way, but the marketplace we play in is quite enormous,” Mr Greensill said.

“Our market share today is about 0.4 per cent, in a market with the potential size of a $US3.5 trillion asset requirement. That’s the market we’re going after. We want to go from 0.4 per cent to [the full] $US3.5 trillion.”

Mr Greensill’s brother Peter also sits on the board of the company, but day-to-day runs the family farming business, which is separate to Greensill.

While the company was founded in the UK, Greensill is still registered in Bundaberg and Mr Greensill, who was named a Commander of the Order of the British Empire last year, has no intention of ever changing that, admitting he’s still a farmer at heart.

“Bundaberg is my home. It’s where I came from and I visited there about eight times last year with my wife and. We have never considered the thought of changing our roots,” he said.

“I’m a farmer at heart. Whenever I’m home I jump on a tractor and have a play. I don’t think of myself as a corporate titan.”

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Henry Sapiecha

Domino’s boss scores massive multi million $$$$ pay day from cheap pizza

AUSTRALIA’S best-paid CEO has made his fortune selling pizza, it has been revealed.

A new report by the Australian Council of Superannuation Investors (ACSI) named Domino’s Pizza boss Don Meij as the country’s highest-earning CEO, after he took home a whopping $36.84 million last year.

The pizza boss made his dough after he exercised options to acquire shares worth $35.7 million.

Don Meij beat out Westfield’s Peter and Steven Lowy, who made a combined $25.9 million in 2017, and Macquarie’s Nicholas Moore, on $25.19 million, for the top spot.

After the news broke, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the pay packets of our company chief executives were “extraordinarily high”.

“As someone who most of his life has worked in businesses that I’ve only owned or been a partner in, I find the amount, the pay rates for people working as an employee for a lot of big public-listed companies extraordinarily high,” Mr Turnbull told 3AW radio on Tuesday.

He said Mr Meij’s salary “seems like a hell of a lot”.

“They’d have to be extremely productive,” he added.

The new figures reveal Aussie CEO’s are enjoying the fattest pay packets in 17 years.

ASCI chief executive Louise Davidson told the ABC the results showed CEO’s were not with it.

“At a time when public trust in business is at a low ebb and wages growth is weak, board decisions to pay large bonuses just for hitting budget targets rather than exceptional performance are especially tone deaf,” Ms Davidson said.

According to the survey, median-realised pay for ASX 100 chief executives rose 12.4 per cent to $4.36 million while bonus payments rocketed by more than 18 per cent.

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Henry Sapiecha

AUSTRALIAN $50 BANK NOTES FORGED WITH HI TECH PRINTER.HERE IS HOW.

A SYDNEY man has pleaded guilty to making $1 million in counterfeit $50 notes, boasting he forced the Reserve Bank of Australia to redesign the nation’s bank note currency.

Benjamin Gillette-Rothschild, 34, claimed the process was so easy he did it while kicking back in a comfortable leather office chair.

With no apparent formal training, he made fake cash so close to the real thing the RBA admitted that most members of the public wouldn’t be able to spot the difference.

He has been sentenced to an ­undisclosed sentence, with Judge Garry Neilson in the Downing Centre District Court imposing a suppression order on most details of the case until “certain future events have eventuated”.

one-of-these-50-australian-bank-notes-is-the-real-deal-the-other-is-100-per-cent-fake-image-www-scamsfakes-com

One of these notes is the real deal, the other is 100 % fake. Scroll to the bottom of the article & see if you guessed correctly.

A set of agreed facts tendered in the case show Gillette-Rothschild pleaded guilty to eight charges relating to making counterfeit money and was sentenced on February 23. Exactly how he learnt as to making the fake notes cannot be ­devulged because of a court order.

An RBA spokesman did not ­respond to questions from The Sunday Telegraph about whether the design of any of Australia’s bank notes were changed in response to Gillette-Rothschild’s scheme….MORE HERE

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Henry Sapiecha

Commonwealth Bank of Australia loses out to having royal commission secrets kept from public

The CBA has lost its attempt to have its secret, commercially sensitive information kept from the public in its evidence given to the banking royal commission.

CBA had asked for a ream of information included in the statement provided by its executive general manager, retail products, Clive Richard van Hore, to the royal commission not to be published.

Commonwealth Bank has lost its bid to have its secrets not published by the royal commission.

The information included the bank’s correspondence with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission, internal documents, and details of its remediation scheme.

The application related to the evidence presented regarding the bank’s credit card-plus product.

It is understood other major banks were planning to ask for similar non-disclosures or had already asked ahead of the decision made by Commissioner Kenneth Hayne.

“Apart from the one case where a particular customer’s name and policy number
would otherwise have been revealed, none of the particular information in respect of
which CBA sought directions was shown to be of a kind that should not be published,” Commissioner Hayne said.

“CBA identified no damage to itself or any other person that would follow from
publication of the material. Subject to the direction described above, the application
is otherwise refused.”

Commissioner Hayne said he encouraged the approach of the CBA to make such a request while the statement was still in draft form.

A spokesman for the bank said it appreciated the decision from the royal commission.

The royal commission will have its first round of hearings from March 13. The first fortnight will look at case studies about areas including home loans, car loans, credit cards, add-on insurance, credit offers and account admin.

Henry Sapiecha

Over 20 Sydney Uni staff under investigation for finance fraud

The University of Sydney is investigating more than 20 staff for financial misconduct.

Fairfax Media understands the university is auditing expenditure estimated at tens of thousands of dollars for entertainment including birthday cakes, coffees, alcohol,stationery & personal items

The staff being put in the firing line work in student administration and recruitment, which generates in excess of $1 billion a year in revenue for the university.

A spokeswoman for the university told Fairfax Media that 21 staff members were being interviewed in relation to allegations of financial misconduct.

“The University takes any allegation of financial misconduct very seriously,” the spokesperson said.

“At this stage, no formal findings of misconduct have been made against any of the staff members being questioned and the process is continuing”

Fairfax Media understands that staff were contacted a few weeks ago and told they were under investigation.

One staff mperson who spoke on the condition of anonymity said staff had been aghast at the “suggestion they had been stealing from their UNIV. employer”.

“Staff were told on a Friday they would be getting formal correspondence on the Monday, but it was not disclosed as to what the charges were,” the staff member stated.

“It was a phone call that was read from a prepared script.”

Staff made written submissions and some were questioned.

“It was thought that 16 birthday cakes was excessive,” the staff member said. “These were minor misdemeanours at worst. It was about whether taking a student out for a coffee was technically a meeting or classed as entertainment.”

The university spokeswoman said the university’s enterprise agreement insisted that when an allegation is made that employees “are given an opportunity to respond to the allegation before a finding is concluded”.

The turmoil in the student administration department now follows the departure of its Executive Director of Global Student Recruitment and Mobility, Michelle Carlin in September last year. It is not alleged that she is in any way linked to the investigation of her former staff.

“I’m absolutely confident that this high achieving team have nothing to worry about,” Ms Carlin said.

“I’m not sure what the reason behind this is, but it is upsetting to see good people placed under this type of stress when they have just been trying to do the best by the university and their results do more than reflect this.”

Ms Carlin’s boss Tyrone Carlin, who is not related to her, stepped down from his position as deputy vice-chancellor (registrar) late last year to return to teaching and research. It is not alleged his departure is linked in any way as well to the current investigation of staff.

University of Sydney Vice-Chancellor Michael Spence sent an email to staff in October last year saying he had accepted Professor Carlin’s resignation.

“Tyrone has decided to step down from his DVC role at the finalty of this year so he can return to his substantive professorial position within the Business School,” Professor Spence said.

“While it is sad to see him leave his current position, I am very pleased that he will be able to return to his teaching and research, and as such remain a very valuable member of the University community.”

Professor Spence credited Professor Carlin for the great transformation of student administration.

“His oversight of the implementation of a whole of institution student administration team completed the ambitious and demanding agenda of moving student administrative functions from faculties and schools towards an integrated, whole of institution delivery approach,” Professor Spence said.

Fairfax Media sought comment from Professor Carlin, but there was no response from him.

In an unrelated matter, yet another deputy vice-chancellor, Professor Shane Houston, left his position last year. He has commenced legal action over his dismissal as the University of Sydney’s first deputy vice-chancellor for Aboriginal services.

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Henry Sapiecha